Staying close to standards

I was surfing web, when I came across yet another Siebel blog. This blog is called Siebel Essentials and I found a pretty interesting and funny article which I thought I should be sharing with you all.

I am not going to post the complete article you can read it from here. I am just going to post part that I really enjoyed reading and I hope you will feel the same.

“Once bitten, twice shy”

If you have the opportunity to observe some of the Siebel CRM projects (or any other standard enterprise software project) across the globe, however small or large they may be, there is a familiar pattern:

  1. Phase of enthusiasm
  2. Learning phase, along with the assurance to “stay close to the standard”
  3. Pilot phase during which most of the requirements become clear (and complex)
  4. Land of oblivion (where the first thing to be forgotten is the promise of 2.)
  5. Regression to coding (believing that writing custom code can solve all problems faster and easier than standard functionality)

These are some typical phases (hope you also note the satirical aspect) that a typical project goes through.

However, we are talking about standard software, which means frankly that the customizing developers at the customer site find themselves in a race against time and hundreds of developers in the Oracle offices who are determined to create another splendid version (Siebel 8.1 is just around the corner these days).

So when a project has matured and all requirements are solved, the upgrade project typically comes next. And it is during the first attempts to upgrade the more or less customized application to the newest version when the whole thing seems to blow up (# 5. of the above list being reason #1 for the blow-up in most cases).

So we can add to our list

  1. A phase of frustration
  2. The vow to stay closer to the standard after the upgrade, which is immediately followed by
  3. The requirement to upgrade the application (which is complex)
  4. The land of oblivion… – we had that before ;-)

Hope you enjoyed it.

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